PG Industries Zimbabwe Limited (PGIN.zw) 2003 Annual Report

first_imgPG Industries Zimbabwe Limited (PGIN.zw) listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2003 annual report.For more information about PG Industries Zimbabwe Limited (PGIN.zw) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the PG Industries Zimbabwe Limited (PGIN.zw) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: PG Industries Zimbabwe Limited (PGIN.zw) 2003 annual report.Company ProfilePG Industries (Zimbabwe) Limited manufactures and sells a range of products through three subsidiaries; PG Merchandising, Zimtile and PG Glass. Its merchandising division has expanded over the years to include timber boards, hardware, plumbing, and wood and glass value-added products. Zimtile is the leading manufacturer of quality concrete roof tiles in Zimbabwe, aswell as pavers and bricks. PG Glass manufactures and markets glass installation solutions for residential and commercial building projects, and offers a repair, replacement and installation service to the automotive industry. PG Industries (Zimbabwe) Ltd. has an international footprint; exporting its products to Botswana, Zambia, Malawi, Mozambique and the DRC. Established in 1948 the company was recently acquired by a Mauritius-based company, Dewei Investments. PG Industries is listed on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Brotherhood of St. Andrew names interim executive director

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA [Brotherhood of St. Andrew] Thomas Welch of Jackson, Mississippi is the new interim executive director to the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, a 134-year old men’s ministry of the Episcopal Church.Previously based in Ambridge, Pennsylvania, the Brotherhood is opening offices in Louisville, Kentucky, this summer. Welch will oversee operational functions for the 4,200-strong ministry.Thomas WelchHe’s a member at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Jackson. A former Eagle Scout, vestry member and diocesan delegate, Welch is also an active lay Eucharistic minister.“We are very excited about the ability to make a statement about expanding the men’s ministry movement throughout the country,” Brotherhood President Jeffrey Butcher said. “We need men to adopt a more active role in their spiritual journey.”Welch’s resume includes a leadership role in the national Cursillo movement as well as leading both Episcopal and Methodist Cursillo retreats. Youth programs are equally important to the Brotherhood’s new interim executive director. Welch has been heavily involved in Camp Fund-shine (a camp for pediatric burn victims) and Camp Bratton-Green in his home diocese in Mississippi, and, most recently, he was director at Camp Hardtner in the Episcopal Diocese of Western Louisiana.Before moving to work within the church, Welch was with the John Hancock Financial Network. In this role, he has practiced risk management, planned giving, college planning, long-term care and retirement planning and protection. This enabled him to have extensive interaction with individual and institutional clients, 501(c)(3) entities and businesses.“This hiring is a statement that tells the church and our members we are very serious concerning the challenge to disciple men and youth to Christ,” President Butcher said. “We are now stepping up to the plate like our Lutheran and Methodist counterparts. The Brotherhood has not had a director for more than a decade.”Welch began his duties with the Brotherhood on June 19. He said he was equally excited to meet the thousands of Brothers throughout the nation, beginning with the organization’s national council meeting June 20-22 in Louisville.“I believe if we are going to reach the millennials in the 21st century we must reach them in new ways and venues with the same 134-year-old Brotherhood of St. Andrew mission but with a different vision of how the mission is fulfilled today,” Welch said.“These days young adults aren’t going to have breakfast on Saturday mornings with a bunch of buddies. They are grabbing premium coffee at the café on their way to play lacrosse followed by a full weekend of other activities.“Why not reach out to them in late evenings during the week? We see other areas of the church have great success in changing the time and even the location of evangelism efforts, though the mission is still the same.“It’s the vision of how we picture the environment that may need to adjust. If we can get them interested, we can get eventually get them to a brick and mortar church on Sunday.“When we’ve done that we have strengthened the local parish. When we strengthen the local parish leadership we grow the church.” Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Tom Shettle says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books July 18, 2017 at 2:06 pm Please send mailing address.T. Shettle, past member Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. People An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Comments (1) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Brotherhood of St. Andrew names interim executive director Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Jul 7, 2017 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

El Obispo Primado intercambia mensajes de esperanza en Puerto Rico mientras…

first_img Province IX Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Tags 2017 Hurricanes, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Por David PaulsenPosted Jan 5, 2018 Latin America, Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 El Obispo Primado intercambia mensajes de esperanza en Puerto Rico mientras persisten los problemas después del huracán Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Hurricane Maria, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing El obispo de Puerto Rico, Rafael Morales, le da un juguete a un niño durante una visita a una clínica temporal en Toa Baja que fungió también de estación de socorro para [damnificados por] el huracán el 3 de enero. El obispo primado Michael Curry, a la derecha, que estaba en medio de una visita pastoral de dos días, ayudó a distribuir los juguetes junto con los tres Reyes Magos que iban con sus trajes típicos. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Toa Baja, Puerto Rico] El obispo Rafael Morales no da la impresión de que sigue inmerso en su trabajo. Llevaba apenas dos meses al frente de la Diócesis de Puerto Rico cuando el huracán María devastó la isla en septiembre, y desde entonces, su personal y el clero de la diócesis han movilizado las iniciativas de ayuda con tal determinación que esta semana le ganaron el reconocimiento del obispo primado Michael Curry durante sus dos días de visita.El huracán María fue y sigue siendo una catástrofe sin paralelo, dijo Morales, pero él está aprovechando la oportunidad para ministrar a sus compatriotas puertorriqueños.“Nuestra gente tiene buen corazón”, dijo él el 3 de enero, en camino al pueblo costero de Toa Baja acompañado por Curry. La cultura de Puerto Rico es de acción de gracias, afirmó Morales. “Esta diócesis es una diócesis de esperanza”.Curry estuvo en Puerto Rico de visita pastoral y predicó el 3 de enero por la noche en la catedral episcopal de San Juan, la capital de este territorio de EE.UU. En la escala que antes hiciera en Toa Baja, a Curry y su delegación les presentaron Abrazos de Amor, una serie de clínicas itinerantes que la diócesis ha ofrecido desde el huracán a través del sistema de salud que dirige. Este y otros ministerios se han fortalecido gracias a las asociaciones ecuménicas y a la colaboración de agencias federales, instituciones locales sin fines de lucro y el Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo.Para el evento de Abrazos de Amor en Toa Baja, se levantaron tiendas en un solar yermo de suelo de gravilla que proporcionó la congregación local de los Discípulos de Cristo, la cual también envió voluntarios que llevaban gorras y camisetas con el mensaje “Ama como Cristo”.“Gracias por lo que han hecho. Es la obra de Dios”, dijo Curry al pastor de los Discípulos de Cristo, el Rdo. Prudencio Rivera Andújar y a su esposa Azalia Gómez.El obispo primado Michael Curry saluda a las personas el 3 de enero en la clínica temporal de Toa Baja. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.Curry anduvo a través de las tiendas dando estrechones de mano y abrazos a los voluntarios diocesanos y a algunos de los cientos de residentes que habían venido a esta clínica de un día de duración. Esperaban su turno para que les midieran la tensión arterial, les tomaran muestras de sangre, los vacunaran, les dieran repuestos de recetas y otros servicios médicos, todos ellos ofrecidos gratuitamente por médicos y enfermeras del hospital episcopal San Lucas, que tiene su sede en Ponce.Todo el mundo del sistema del San Lucas participó en las clínicas temporales, le dijo a Curry Jesús Cruz Correa, director médico del hospital. “Rotamos los médicos”. Los pacientes que necesitan ulterior atención médica los remitimos al hospital para visitas de seguimiento.Un camión del hospital, estacionado cerca de una de las tiendas, estaba lleno de alimentos, agua y artículos de aseo personal para distribuírselos a las familias. El almuerzo y la música estaban incluidos en el evento, junto con actividades para los niños.Morales, que pasó siete años como sacerdote en Toa Baja, fue un anfitrión entusiasta, riéndose con frecuencia y mostrando su sonrisa contagiosa casi siempre. Él es un episcopal que habla constantemente de sus bendiciones, de las bendiciones de la diócesis, de las bendiciones de su gente, incluso en un momento de tantas privaciones. La iglesia se siente motivada a interactuar con la comunidad, afirmó él.“Es una bendición, es un ministerio”, le dijo él a Curry horas antes ese día luego de saludarlo en el hotel de San Juan. “Ahora tenemos momentos difíciles, pero Jesús nos está bendiciendo”.Meses después del huracán, los habitantes de la isla aún se enfrentan a dificultadesLa escena en torno a Toa Baja, a unos 20 minutos al oeste de San Juan, apenas insinúa la magnitud del desastre que aún afecta a gran parte de la isla más de 100 días después que la tormenta azotara como un violento huracán de categoría 4. Tocó tierra el 20 de septiembre con vientos sostenidos de 249 kph, interrumpiendo el servicio eléctrico y telefónico de los 3,4 millones de habitantes de la isla. Causó aludes de lodo, destruyó casas y empresas, derribó árboles y provocó extrema escasez de alimentos y agua potable.La cifra oficial de muertes debido a la tormenta es de 64, pero un análisis del New York Times el mes pasado sugiere que la cifra real de bajas mortales es exponencialmente mayor, ascendiendo posiblemente a 1.000 fallecidos.Los daños a la infraestructura de Puerto Rico han sido particularmente devastadores. La oficina del Gobernador anunció la semana pasada que sólo se había restablecido el servicio eléctrico a un 55 por ciento de clientes en toda la isla, y que el regreso del alumbrado en algunas zonas remotas podría no ocurrir hasta mayo.En Trujillo Alto, un poste de la electricidad descansa derribado a la orilla de la carretera que conduce a las oficinas de la diócesis episcopal, en un barrio de los que todavía no tienen servicio eléctrico. Algunos reflectores en las carreteras del pueblo sólo recientemente han comenzado a funcionar de nuevo, pero hasta esta semana el equipo de Morales trabajaba en un edificio que aún depende de un generador.Algunas comunidades de las montañas del interior se han visto aun más afectadas. “Las carreteras están completamente destruidas”, dijo el Rdo. Edwin Orlando Vélez a través de una traductora mientras visitábamos la clínica de Abrazos de Amor en Toa Baja.Orlando Vélez atiende a dos congregaciones en la parte centrooccidental de la isla, en los pueblos de Lares y Maricao. Muchas personas aún se encuentran sin electricidad ni agua, dijo él. Debido a los deslaves y el derribo de árboles, resulta difícil conducir.Las iglesias están trabajando con los gobiernos municipales para ayudar en la limpieza, pero Orlando Vélez y otros sacerdotes también han estado ministrando a víctimas del huracán mediante visitas a los hogares. Con frecuencia encuentran que sostener la mano de alguien y escuchar sus historias marca la diferencia.“Yo diría que tienen muy buen ánimo”, afirmó él. “La gente en las montañas está acostumbradas a pasar trabajo. Debido a eso tienen una actitud de aceptación”.Algunos de los sacerdotes de la diócesis perdieron sus hogares. Otros no tuvieron electricidad en sus iglesias hasta que recibieron generadores, gracias al Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo y otras entidades de la Iglesia, tal como la Diócesis de Maryland.En los primeros días después de la tormenta, con las líneas telefónicas caídas y el servicio de celulares inestable, el Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo logró conseguir teléfonos satelitales para la diócesis, de suerte que el equipo de Morales pudiera coordinar iniciativas de ayuda pastoral y médica con clérigos que se encontraran lejos. El Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo también ha costeado alimentos y agua y, debido a su experiencia en huracanes anteriores, está ayudando a la diócesis a coordinar esfuerzos con agencias federales y otras organizaciones humanitarias.Rob Radtke, presidente del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, que acompañó a Curry en su visita de dos días, definió a Puerto Rico como “una diócesis de alta capacidad”. La diócesis ha potenciado exitosamente su sistema de atención sanitaria como parte de las iniciativas de ayuda, explicó él, y se ha beneficiado de un liderazgo emprendedor y bien organizado con genuino interés en servir a su comunidad.“Es en esto donde la Iglesia tiene un don particular. Esto es cierto lo mismo en Puerto Rico como en cualquier otra parte”, dijo Radtke a Episcopal News Service. “Tiene acceso a los más íntimos sentimientos de las vidas de la gente, y disfruta de un alto nivel de confianza que puede invocar desde el punto de vista de personas que se acercan a la Iglesia y ven a la Iglesia como un lugar que responderá a sus necesidades”.El obispo primado Michael Curry se suma a un grupo de la Diócesis de Puerto Rico que llevó a cabo visitas a hogares el 3 de enero para proporcionarles atención médica a vecinos enfermos en Toa Baja. Aquí el personal médico examina a Mariana Cabrera, de 83 años, que padece de diabetes, hipertensión y úlceras. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.Morales expresó su decepción por lo ha que sido hasta el momento la respuesta del gobierno federal. Él no cree que la Administración Federal de Asistencia en Desastres (FEMA por su sigla en inglés) haya mostrado el mismo nivel de compromiso con Puerto Rico que con otras comunidades de Estados Unidos continental que fueron azotadas por huracanes en 2017, tales como Houston. En áreas donde se percibe que el gobierno no ha hecho lo suficiente, su diócesis espera redoblar sus esfuerzos.“La bendición es que ahora somos una diócesis misionera”, dijo Morales a Curry durante un almuerzo de pollo, arroz y frijoles, mientras tres hombres vestidos como los Reyes Magos repartían bolsas de alimentos y agua a las familias que visitaban la clínica de Toa Baja.Después del almuerzo, Morales y Curry se reunieron con los tres Reyes Magos para distribuir juguetes a una larga cola de niños sonrientes y a sus padres —“la Epifanía por anticipado”, dijo Morales.En presencia de la desesperación, se buscan señales de esperanzaCurry tenía otra referencia bíblica en mente. “Ustedes han convertido el agua del huracán en el vino de la esperanza”, les dijo a los líderes de la Iglesia en Toa Baja, brindándoles un adelanto de su sermón horas después.Esa noche, en la Santa Eucaristía en la catedral de San Juan el Bautista, Curry habló de la lectura del evangelio de la Epifanía que repercutía en la misión de la Iglesia local —como los tres magos del evangelio de Mateo tropezaron con un milagro, y cómo los episcopales en Puerto Rico pueden encontrar milagros en sí mismos. Luego invocó la historia de las Bodas de Caná, en las cuales Jesús tomó jarras de agua y las convirtió en vino para todos los que estaban allí reunidos.“He oído hablar de vecinos que se ocupan de vecinos”, dijo, destacando ejemplos de Puerto Rico, de los sacerdotes que se han allegado a personas con viviendas dañadas, de los médicos y enfermeras que conoció en el “hospital de campaña” en Toa Baja.“Ustedes han convertido el agua de[l huracán] María en el vino de la esperanza”, le dijo a la congregación.Él concluyó con palabras de aliento, para que los episcopales de Puerto Rico se mantengan siguiendo el camino de Jesús en tanto ministran a sus prójimos.“Cuando atraviesen la tormenta, mantengan la cabeza en alto”, dio. “Si siguen a Jesús, nunca andarán solos”.Tal aliento es bien acogido. La desesperación es una constante amenaza para las familias que siguen luchando después del huracán, dijo Damaris DeJesus, que sirve de secretaria de la junta directiva de la diócesis y que condujo a Curry y a los demás visitantes a algunas de sus citas esta semana.“Por ejemplo, esa casa”, dijo señalando un edificio de apartamentos afectado junto a la carretera en Toa Baja. “La familia, ¿qué va a hacer?” Al mismo tiempo, ella le hizo honor a Morales en enfatizar la esperanza al llamar a la diócesis a servir a los necesitados.Damaris DeJesus explica la mezcla de desesperación y esperanza de los puertorriqueños durante el viaje de regreso de Toa Baja a San Juan el 3 de enero con el obispo primado Michael Curry, a la derecha, y la delegación de la Iglesia Episcopal. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.DeJesus es psicóloga y enseña en la Universidad de Puerto Rico y, después del huracán, trabajo con pasantes en la creación de sesiones de consejería de grupos con familias que se enfrentan al trauma psicológico de afrontar grandes pérdidas. Ella se quedó impresionada por la perspectiva de un niñito de 6 años, que estaba viviendo en una tienda con sus padres porque la casa de su familia se había visto afectada por la tormenta.“Desde el momento en que lo conocí, vi lo feliz que era”, le dijo ella a Curry y sus acompañantes a través de un intérprete. El niño le había señalado todo lo que su familia aún tenía, incluidos unos a otros. “Le agradecía a Dios el estar con sus padres”.El 4 de enero, Morales concertó que Curry oyera testimonios de personas que sobrevivieron el huracán. Luego de hacerle a Curry y su personal un recorrido por las oficinas diocesanas en Trujillo Alto, los invitó a almorzar afuera bajo una tienda de campaña, donde el ruido del generador se mezclaba con el sonido de la música en vivo.Antes de que sirvieran el almuerzo, cuatro episcopales se levantaron para hablarle al grupo de varias docenas de personas acerca de sus experiencias durante el huracán María y después de su paso. Kelma L. Nieves Serrano, de Fajardo, contó cómo ella y su esposa perdieron todo: su casa inundada y su auto destruido.“También tuvimos a Dios como nuestro compañero” dijo ella valiéndose de una traductora. Y se sintieron afortunadas de contar con miembros de la comunidad episcopal que estaban pendientes de ellas y que les brindaron alimento, agua y transporte cuando lo necesitaron. “Tenemos dificultades, pero estamos en pie”.Kelma L. Nieves Serrano, de Fajardo, describe sus experiencias después del paso del huracán María en un evento el 4 de enero preparado por el obispo Rafael Morales frente a las oficinas diocesanas en Trujillo Alto. Foto de David Paulsen/ENS.Elfidia Pizarro Parrilla, de Loiza, dijo que ella y sus vecinos estaban igualmente agradecidos por el apoyo de la Iglesia Episcopal. El huracán “viró nuestra casa al revés. Yo he perdido todo lo que tenía”, dijo Pizarro Parrilla. “La Iglesia nos dijo ‘estamos aquí con ustedes’”.Morales dio su propio testimonio, empezando por reconocer su propia desesperanza después del azote del huracán. Él vino a las oficinas de la diócesis, vio la destrucción circundante y se preguntó qué podía hacer. Se sintió inspirado al ver una cruz, que seguía en pie afuera, detrás del edificio principal.“Cuando vi la cruz, entendí que el Señor estaba ciertamente en medio de la tormenta y que él estaba aquí después de la tormenta”, dijo Morales al grupo reunido en la tienda.La tienda se levantó sobre una gran placa de concreto frente al edificio principal [de la diócesis] y sirvió como un símbolo de resurrección mientras Morales hablaba de cómo Dios había guiado la diócesis para que saliera delante. El huracán destruyó el edificio de una iglesia provisional que se alzaba sobre la placa de concreto, que ahora sostenía una reunión rebosante de fraternidad y resolución.“Lo que huracán se lleva puede rehacerse en algo bueno”, afirmó él.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él a [email protected] Dinorah Padro colaboró con la traducción para este reportaje. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

Work begins to clear mines from Qasr el Yahud –…

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Tampa, FL Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Posted Mar 20, 2018 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Israel-Palestine, Rector Belleville, IL Middle East Rector Bath, NC Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] Work to clear mines from the traditional site of Jesus’ baptism at Qasr el Yahud – the Castle of the Jews – has begun, almost two years after permission or the work was granted. The international anti-mine charity Halo Trust has been working with the State of Israel, the Palestinian Authority, and the eight denominations whose churches and monasteries have been made out of bounds as a result of the mines, to raise the funds necessary to clear the site. It was mined after the Six Day War in 1967. A path to the River Jordan was cleared in 2000 for the Pope’s visit; but the site wasn’t opened for tourists and pilgrims until 2011.Read the entire article here. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion, Work begins to clear mines from Qasr el Yahud – the west bank site of Jesus’ baptism Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Charity PR €˜must buy-in to fundraising’

first_img Fundraising is way down the list of priorities for most charity PR departments, and we need to get our PR people to ‘buy-in’ to fundraising to raise the profile and attract more media coverage.Turner PR’s account director Ian MacQuillin said at yesterday’s IoF conference on Fundraising PR and Communications, that he had been shocked in the five years he edited Professional Fundraising magazine to find that PR departments not only found the trade press for fundraising unimportant, but that they seemed to see the fundraising function itself as un-newsworthy.Fundraising is not the ugly duckling you have to get out of the way before you can promote a celebrity and her latest PR venture, he told delegates. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Charity PR €˜must buy-in to fundraising’ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 8 November 2006 | Newscenter_img You should make the most of the trade press, he said. Trade press is ‘onside’ and it lays the foundations for national, consumer and broadcast coverage. Stories in the trade press do filter through to the national press.The best way to attract a journalist’s attention, apart from building up a good relationship with them, is to make sure in your press releases you have a clear sell in the first paragraph and a good headline. You have seven seconds to convince a journalist they want to use your press release, MacQuillin said, as this is the amount of time a journalist spends scanning a press release that lands on their desk before they decide whether to use it or spike it. Tagged with: Individual giving 33 total views, 2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Aspinall Foundation launches monthly giving Facebook app

first_imgAspinall Foundation launches monthly giving Facebook app Howard Lake | 3 June 2008 | News Tagged with: Digital Facebook The Aspinall Foundation have launched a new fundraising application on social network site Facebook. Developed with assistance from London-based BT agilemedia iDonate, the application enables Facebook users to purchase an Aspinall Foundation roundel for a suggested donation of £1.50.In addition to donating, users can choose to send the badge to a friend as a gift to spread the charity’s message further.The badge includes a monthly giving element. It remains on the user’s profile for one month, after which it can be renewed with a further donation, enabling the user to pledge an ongoing commitment to the work of the charity.All payments via the application are securely processed by BT iDonate.Sarah Tite, Fundraising Manager at The Aspinall Foundation said: “Working with BT on the Facebook application is enabling us to potentially reach not just 8 million people in the UK but the 70 million users worldwide. We are pleased that BT chose to support us in this way.”www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=10658278506 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis 29 total views, 2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Undocumented students take over Regents meeting

first_imgAtlanta — In a bold action, Georgia undocumented youth and their allies entered the meeting room of the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia on May 10, and then sat in the chairs of the appointed policymakers for the state’s public university system.The great majority of the board’s 19 members, who each serve 7-year terms, are heads of major corporations such as Georgia Power, PruittHealth, Synovus financial services, and liquor and beer distributor Crown Distributors. Several are close political allies and donors of Gov. Nathan Deal. Only one of the two women regents has any background in education.Since 2011, graduating high school students without papers have been barred from applying to the top five universities and are ineligible to pay in-state tuition at all of the system’s other universities, colleges and technical schools. Out-of-state tuition can be double, triple or even more, effectively denying access to higher education to thousands of undocumented youth no matter their test scores or academic qualifications. They are not eligible for federal Pell grants or the state HOPE scholarship funds.With supporters in the audience, seven young people took the regents’ places at the front of the room and convened a “people’s hearing.” After testimony from state Sen. Vincent Fort, immigration rights activist and lawyer Azadeh Shahshahani and undocumented student Salvador Alvarado, they announced their decision to revoke the two policies, 4.1.6 and 4.3.4, and end segregation and discrimination in Georgia’s institutions of higher learning.When the two undocumented youth and five young allies would not cede the seats to the businessmen and political appointees of the governor, they were arrested by the Capitol police on trespass charges.All were released about 12 hours later from the Fulton County Jail. Their civil disobedience action received wide news coverage.The campaign to change the Board of Regents’ policy dates to 2012, when the federal government provided “legal presence” to those brought to the U.S. as children who met additional criteria.This program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival, grants work permits and driver’s licenses to those accepted into the program and exempts them from deportation.In 2011, the Georgia Legislature enacted a number of anti-immigrant laws that denied those without “lawful presence” certain benefits, including full access to higher public education. The political establishment, including the courts, so far have declared that federal “legal presence” is less than Georgia’s “lawful presence.”The May 10 action and many others have been organized by Freedom University students, a nationally recognized alternative school initiated by professors at the University of Georgia to provide college-level courses for undocumented students, now located in Atlanta. Dozens of highly motivated and qualified students are continuing to advance academically but are also learning the skills of political activism.Freedom University youth have been accepted into numerous universities and colleges across the U.S., where they have excelled. Twenty-one states currently have no restrictions on admission of undocumented students and six, including California and Texas, offer financial aid.Georgia, and several other former Confederate states, fought to keep segregated education for years past the 1954 Supreme Court ruling outlawing so-called “separate but equal” public schools.The Freedom University students see themselves as struggling in the same tradition as the many thousands who marched, sat in and went to jail to end Jim Crow laws denying African Americans their civil and human rights.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Missing 76-year-old hiker found alive, authorities say

first_imgMarin County Sheriff’s Office(MARIN COUNTY, Calif.) — An elderly man who had vanished while hiking in Northern California was found alive Tuesday night, authorities said.Robert Bennett, 76, was reported missing on Monday after he failed to return from a hike in a Marin County nature preserve. The Marin County Sheriff’s Office had said Bennett was last seen that afternoon walking toward a trailhead that leads to Big Rock Ridge, which borders the cities of Novato and San Rafael.Search and rescue teams scoured the trails in the area all day Tuesday.“We anticipate working through the night trying to find Robert,” the Marin County Sheriff’s Office said in a post on its official Twitter page.Police dogs eventually found Bennett that night and directed rescuers to his location. The Marin County Sheriff’s Office tweeted that emergency crews were “working on extracting him,” without providing further details on the matter.Bennett was later transported to a local hospital where he was reunited with his family. The Marin County Sheriff’s Office said his condition is unknown at this time. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Radical benefits reform needed to protect both agents, tenants and landlords, says trade body

first_imgHome » News » COVID-19 news » Radical benefits reform needed to protect both agents, tenants and landlords, says trade body previous nextCOVID-19 newsRadical benefits reform needed to protect both agents, tenants and landlords, says trade bodyAccreditation body Safeagent has suggested half a dozen or so well-argued ideas to stop a tsunami of evictions after the latest ban ends.Nigel Lewis24th August 20200683 Views The portion of the private rental market funded by Universal Credit payments needs a radical overhaul if mass evictions are to be avoided in the coming months, a leading trade body has claimed.Letting agent accreditation scheme Safeagent has published a blueprint for the sector that it says will help prevent the ‘tsunami’ of evictions predicted by Shelter once the ban ends on September 20th.“At Safeagent, we want to see a fair, and appropriate system put into place, which ensures tenants who are struggling to pay their rent, and landlords who are facing financial difficulties as a result, have a clear way forward,” the document says.The suggested measures include:Reforming Universal Credit (UC) and letting tenants opt to have their housing element paid direct to their landlord or agent from the outset, side stepping the much-criticised Alternative Payment Arrangements.Letting agents who are paid a tenant’s UC housing payments direct should be made to protect the funds via a protection scheme similar to the one that must be used for deposits.Increase the Housing Allowance further to prevent shortfalls, and better fund the Discretionary Housing Payments scheme that local authorities can pay to tenants.Wider use of legally-binding, transparent and affordable Repayment Plans by letting agents and landlords.Lenders should reduce the monthly premiums on a landlord’s buy-to-let loan if their tenant’s Universal Credit payment are reduced and do not over the cost of their mortgage.Landlord who get into debt while housing tenants who can’t pay the full rent via Universal Credit should be given a grant to reduce or clear their debt.Similarly, landlords who don’t have mortgages should be offered a ‘top up’ facility to get them through the crisis.“What we need now is less of the vitriol which pervades any discussion around arrears and evictions,” says Isobel Thomson, Safeagent Chief Executive (right).“Instead, we need collaborative efforts to produce a workable process which will protect the interests of all, as we get through this extraordinarily challenging period together.”Read the proposals in full.evictions ban Isobel Thomson SAFEagent August 24, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

NEUROHOSPITALIST/STROKE NEUROLOGIST-ASSISTANT, ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSOR (CHS)

first_imgPosition Summary: Position Vacancy ID: Stroke, Neurohospitalist or Neurocritical Care SubspecialtyFellowship training. Candidates for associate professor (CHS) orfull professor (CHS) rank must meet criteria for appointment atrank per UW School of Medicine and Public Health guidelines forappointment and promotion on the CHS track.Academic credentials and experience for appointment at the selectedrank of a non-tenure School of Medicine and Public Health trackfocusing primarily on clinical and teaching excellence. Appointmentat the rank of associate or full professor rank requires meetingcriteria for appointment level as defined in School of Medicine andPublic Health guidelines for promotion or appointment to associateprofessor or professor on the Clinical Health Sciences track. FTE: Academic Staff-Renewable Working Title: Job no: 90494-ASWork type: Faculty Full or Part Time, Faculty-Full Time,Faculty-Part TimeDepartment: SMPH/NEUROLOGY/NEUROLOGYLocation: MadisonCategories: Health Care, Medical, Social Services,Instructional, Research, Scientific The Department of Neurology at the University of Wisconsin Schoolof Medicine and Public Health seeks neurohospitalists or strokeneurologists to join our expanding Neurohospitalist and StrokePrograms at UW Hospitals, VA Hospital and UW Health clinics. Thepositions includes opportunities for teaching, clinical andresearch activities in an academic environment with adult generaland neurology subspecialists and faculty in other servicesincluding neuropsychology, neurosurgery, neuroradiology, clinicalneurophysiology and basic science research faculty. Clinicalactivities will involve attending duties in neurology clinics andUW Health clinics and on inpatient services at the University ofWisconsin Hospitals. OCTOBER 10, 2017 Additional Information: Additional Link:Full Position Details The School of Medicine and Public Health has a deep and profoundcommitment to diversity both as an end in itself but, also as avaluable means for eliminating health disparities. As such, westrongly encourage applications from candidates who foster andpromote the values of diversity and inclusion. The University of Wisconsin is an Equal Opportunity andAffirmative Action Employer.The Annual Security and Fire Safety Report contains current campussafety and disciplinary policies, crime statistics for the previous3 calendar years, and on-campus student housing fire safetypolicies and fire statistics for the previous 3 calendar years.UW-Madison will provide a paper copy upon request; please contactthe University ofWisconsin Police Department . Please upload a CV/resume and cover letter referring to thePosition Vacancy Listing number. At a future date you may be askedto provide at least three letters of reference.The deadline for assuring full consideration is October 5, 2017,however positions will remain open and applications may beconsidered until the position is filled. Instructions to Applicants: Advertised Salary: This is a renewable appointment. NegotiableANNUAL (12 months) Anticipated Begin Date: Term:center_img Hiring Department: Kathleen [email protected] Contact: PROFESSOR (CHS)(D01NN) or ASSOC PROFESSOR (CHS)(D02NN) or ASSTPROFESSOR (CHS)(D03NN) Degree and area of specialization: MD, MD/PhD or DO – Board eligible or certified in Neurology.Stroke, Neurocritical Care or Neurohospitalist fellowship trainingor equivalent experience. Relay Access (WTRS): 7-1-1 (out-of-state: TTY: 800.947.3529, STS:800.833.7637) and above Phone number (See RELAY_SERVICE for furtherinformation. ) A535100-MEDICAL SCHOOL/NEUROLOGY/NEUROLOGY License or Certificate: 90494-AS Neurohospitalist/Stroke Neurologist-ASSISTANT, ASSOCIATE OR FULLPROFESSOR (CHS) Employment Class: Official Title: 75% – 100% Licensed or eligible for Wisconsin medical license. Board eligibleor certified in Neurology. Minimum number of years and type of relevant workexperience: NOTE: A Period of Evaluation will be Required Applications Open: Apr 27 2017 Central Daylight TimeApplications Close:last_img read more