ECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS March 19, 2018

first_img Pinterest Facebook By admin – March 19, 2018 Pinterest Local NewsCrime Facebook Arts Council of Midland logo The following is a list of felony dispositions from the Ector County District Clerk’s Office. Listed attorneys do not necessarily represent who was involved when the case was disposed.ABANDONING/ENDANGERING CHILDAmanda Gabrielle Estep, 29, pleaded guilty March 12 to abandoning or endangering a child with criminal negligence and was sentenced to four years probation and deferred adjudication. Estep also had a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, dismissed. Judge John Smith approved the deal. Bret Mansur was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.ASSAULTJoel Junior Carrasco, 31, pleaded guilty March 8 to assault of a family or household member with a previous conviction and was sentenced to four years probation and deferred adjudication. Carrasco also had a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, dismissed March 9 as part of the deal. Smith approved the deal. BJ Brown was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.David Marin, 34, had charges of assault of a public servant and bail jumping and failure to appear dismissed March 8. Judge James Rush presided. David Zavoda was the defense attorney and Clay George was the prosecutor.Joshua Walker, 32, pleaded guilty March 8 to assault of a family or household member by impeding breath or circulation and possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to three years in prison and six months in state jail, respectively, on those charges. Smith approved the deal. Matt Thomas was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Henry Esparza Plata, 39, pleaded guilty March 9 to aggravated assault causing serious bodily injury and was sentenced to six years probation. Rush approved the deal. Damian Castillo was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Fabian Sebastian, 26, had a charge of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon dismissed March 13. Smith presided. Justin Low was the defense attorney and Dusty Gallivan was the prosecutor.BURGLARYJudith Cardinale, 69, pleaded guilty March 9 to burglary of a building and theft of a firearm and was sentenced to three years probation and deferred adjudication. Rush approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Israel Porras, 27, had a charge of burglary of a habitation dismissed March 9. Smith presided. Michael McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATEDJesse Abila, 49, pleaded guilty March 8 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to five years probation. Judge Stacy Trotter approved the deal. Daniel Sarabia Jr. was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Rudy Martin Esparza, 52, pleaded guilty March 8 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to four years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Kevin Acker was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Michael Ray Llanez, 31, pleaded guilty March 8 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to 10 years probation. Smith approved the deal. Gary Garrison was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Omar Garcia Soto, 41, pleaded guilty March 8 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to two years in prison. Trotter approved the deal. Mansur was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Jeremy Michael Kenney, 39, pleaded guilty March 13 to driving while intoxicated, third or more, and was sentenced to five years in prison. Trotter approved the deal. Mansur was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.EVADING ARRESTGeorge Flores Gutierrez Jr., 43, pleaded guilty March 7 to evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to four years in prison. Judge Denn Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Cristian Gonzalez Fuentes, 19, had a charge of evading arrest with a vehicle dismissed March 13. Smith presided. Jason Schoel was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH REGISTRATIONDaniel Orona Perez, 33, pleaded guilty March 8 to failure to comply with registration requirements and was sentenced to two years in prison. Smith approved the deal. Don Fletcher was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.FRAUDULENT USE/POSSESSION OF IDENTIFYING INFORMATIONJennifer Monique Lester, 35, pleaded guilty March 8 to fraudulent use or possession of identifying information, less than five items, and was sentenced to 216 days in state jail. Lester was given credit for time served. Whalen approved the deal. Garrison was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.HINDERING APPREHENSION/PROSECUTION OF FELONAshley Cruz, 22, pleaded guilty March 12 to hindering the apprehension or prosecution of a known felon and was sentenced to two years in prison. Cruz also had a charge of evading arrest with a vehicle dismissed. Smith approved the deal. Tony Chavez and Adrian Chavez were the defense attorneys. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.INTOXICATION ASSAULTEver Ortega, 30, pleaded guilty March 8 to intoxication assault with a vehicle causing serious bodily injury and was sentenced to three years in prison. Smith approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Kevin Reyes-Mendez, 22, pleaded guilty March 9 to intoxication assault with a vehicle causing serious bodily injury and was sentenced to seven years probation. Reyes-Mendez also had a charge of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon dismissed as part of the deal. Rush approved the deal. Robert Garcia was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.MANUFACTURE/DELIVERY OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCEBrandi Leigh McLendon, 35, pleaded guilty March 8 to manufacture or delivery of a controlled substance, four grams or more but less than 200 grams, and was sentenced to two years in prison. Smith approved the deal. Low was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Alonzo Terrazas Sigala, 22, pleaded guilty March 9 to manufacture or delivery of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to six months in state jail. Rush approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.POSSESSION OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCEStefan Thomas Almond, 48, pleaded guilty March 7 to possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine), less than one gram, and was sentenced to 671 days in state jail. Almond also had a charge of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon dismissed. Rush and Whalen approved the deal. J. Roxane Blount was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Esteban Rojelio Juarez, 20, pleaded guilty March 7 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Hunter Bayne Notley, 25, pleaded guilty March 7 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 12 months in state jail. Notley also had a charge of evading arrest with a vehicle dismissed. Whalen approved the deal. Mike Holmes was the defense attorney and Cassandra Moholt Cheek was the prosecutor.Jonathan Lee Ramirez, 26, pleaded guilty March 7 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Al Eugene Watkins, 22, pleaded guilty March 7 to possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Kaleigh Nicole Witzel, 20, pleaded guilty March 7 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Emelio Contreras, 22, pleaded guilty March 8 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Marc Chastain was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Gregory Galindo Dutchover, 25, pleaded guilty March 8 to possession of a controlled substance, four grams or more but less than 200 grams, and was sentenced to four years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Jimmy Wendell Johnson, 53, pleaded guilty March 8 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Blount was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Jose A. Lozano, 22, pleaded guilty March 8 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Jack Ladd Jr. was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Israel Perez, 34, had a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, dismissed March 8. Whalen presided. Thomas Morgan was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Clint Thomas Purifoy, 38, had charges of possession of a controlled substance, one gram or more but less than four grams; and bail jumping and failure to appear dismissed March 8. Rush presided. Sarabia was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Jasmine Lupita Ramon, 21, pleaded guilty March 8 to possession of a controlled substance (methamphetamine) and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Julio Cesar Chavez, 27, pleaded guilty March 12 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Fletcher was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Rodolfo Leija Deanda Jr., 18, pleaded guilty March 12 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 180 days in state jail. Trotter approved the deal. Richard Abalos was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Dewayne Allen Press, 48, pleaded guilty March 12 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation. Trotter approved the deal. Blount was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Jose Eliazer Bernal, 63, pleaded guilty March 13 to possession of a controlled substance, four grams or more but less than 200 grams, and was sentenced to eight years in prison. Whalen approved the deal. Lee Stringham was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Cheyanne Leslie, 30, pleaded guilty March 13 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to six months in state jail. Whalen approved the deal. Adrian Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Terri Lynn Newell, 45, pleaded guilty March 13 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to 180 days in state jail. Trotter approved the deal. Mansur was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Ernest Allen Wheeler, 54, pleaded guilty March 13 to possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Mansur was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.PROHIBITED SUBSTANCE/ITEM IN CORRECTIONAL FACILITYBri’Ana Dynique Madison, 22, pleaded guilty March 9 to prohibited substance or item in a correctional facility and was sentenced to four years probation and deferred adjudication. Madison also had a charge of bail jumping and failure to appear dismissed. Rush approved the deal. Blount was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.ROBBERYJuan Carlos Avalos, 30, pleaded guilty March 7 to two counts of aggravated robbery and was sentenced to 10 years probation and deferred adjudication. Avalos also had a charge of possession of a controlled substance, less than one gram, dismissed. Whalen approved the deal. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.SEXUAL ASSAULT OF CHILDAxel Ivan Ramirez Nunez, 36, pleaded guilty March 8 to sexual assault of a child and was sentenced to seven years in prison. Ramirez Nunez also had a charge of aggravated sexual assault of a child dismissed as part of the deal. Trotter approved the deal. Ladd was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.STALKINGBreshon A. Butler, 20, had a charge of stalking dismissed March 13 due to insufficient evidence. Rush presided. Tony Chavez was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.TAMPER/FABRICATE PHYSICAL EVIDENCEEsteban Alvarado Lomas, 35, had a charge of tampering with or fabricating physical evidence dismissed March 13 in the interest of justice. Rush presided. Chastain was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.THEFTTony Davell Cleaver, 50, pleaded guilty March 7 to theft, less than $1,500, with two or more prior theft convictions, and was sentenced to 180 days in state jail. Cleaver was given credit for time served. Trotter approved the deal. Schoel was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Abigail Casimira Rueda, 24, pleaded guilty March 9 to theft from a person and was sentenced to two years probation and deferred adjudication. Rueda also had a charge of engaging in organized criminal activity dismissed March 9 as part of the deal. Rush approved the deal. McLeaish was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.Felipe Ruben Carrillo, 18, pleaded guilty March 13 to theft and evading arrest with a vehicle and was sentenced to five years probation and deferred adjudication. Trotter approved the deal. Jerry Caddel was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed.UNAUTHORIZED USE OF VEHICLEMatthew Mark Woods, 47, pleaded guilty March 7 to unauthorized use of a vehicle and was sentenced to 229 days in state jail. Woods was given credit for time served. Whalen approved the deal. Chastain was the defense attorney. The prosecuting attorney was not listed. ECTOR COUNTY FELONY DISPOSITIONS March 19, 2018 WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp Twitter Previous articleRonald Bennett to be honored at Texas Federation of Music Clubs conventionNext articleLongtime MCH volunteer Stevenson looks back on decades of service adminlast_img read more

Vaccines can get us to herd immunity, despite the variants

first_imgA Harvard immunologist said current vaccines appear to be effective enough to end the pandemic, despite growing concerns that more infectious COVID-19 variants would severely blunt the effectiveness of the preventative treatments and set the nation back in its fight against the disease.Galit Alter, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT, and Harvard, said the fast-spreading U.K. variant seems able to evade some vaccine protection, and the South African variant appears able to skirt even more. Despite that, she said, none have completely escaped the body’s post-vaccination immune responses.That’s because, Alter said, though much attention has focused on how antibodies boosted after vaccination target their attack on the virus’ spike protein, the immune system has an array of other defenses that vaccination also mobilizes, including antibodies that attack other parts of the virus, and, importantly, T-cells that attack the infected cells the virus hijacks in order to replicate.“What we’re seeing is that these variants don’t seem to affect T-cell immunity all that much and they [the T-cells] seem to be as effective in recognizing these variants as they do the original virus,” Alter said. “What that means is that we actually have very important backup mechanisms built into our vaccines that will continue to provide protection against these newly emerging variants.”Alter, speaking during a noontime briefing Wednesday by the Massachusetts Consortium on Pathogen Readiness (MassCPR), said that even if our most effective vaccines’ effectiveness falls to 70 percent from 95 percent, the world still has a path to achieving the herd immunity that can end the pandemic. “While we in the medical community are guardedly hopeful and optimistic … there is cause for concern that with the appearance of viral variants across the globe, we might be facing a decidedly novel stage of the contagion: COVID 2.0.” — George Daley, dean of Harvard Medical School We may duck a surge from variant that sent Britain reeling “What we see is that immunity conferred by the vaccine can essentially completely limit the breakout of any infections in the population,” Alter said. “These data give us hope that even with the vaccines that do not confer 95 percent protection against these emerging variants, the light at the end of the tunnel is approaching.”That doesn’t mean the road ahead will be easy, Alter said. She acknowledged that the lower level of effectiveness against the variants means that more people will have to be vaccinated to achieve the same population-wide protective effects. Earlier estimates based on highly effective vaccines held that 50 percent to 60 percent of the population would have to be vaccinated in order to create herd effects. At 70 percent effectiveness, she said, the threshold will rise to roughly 75 percent, significantly higher, but nonetheless still achievable.,Short of that hopeful scenario, Alter said, lies another that is nonetheless preferable to the continuation of the current wave of widespread illness and death. Because the vaccines greatly reduce severe disease and death, a vaccination campaign that removes the most severe cases from the pandemic would mean that those that remained would be mild and asymptomatic cases, something similar to those caused by its close viral cousin: the common cold. In that case, Alter said, though the virus wouldn’t be eliminated, its effect would be blunted enough that the pandemic would also effectively end.The online event, “Demystifying SARS-CoV-2 Variants,” was sponsored by MassCPR and hosted by HMS Dean George Daley. Daley said as we approach the mid-March anniversary of the World Health Organization declaring the coronavirus a global pandemic, the death toll from the virus has reached heights almost unimagined a year ago. Globally, there have been more than 113 million cases and 2.5 million deaths. In the U.S. alone, there have been more than 28 million cases and 500,000 deaths.“The toll in lives has been extraordinary and the economic loss, also staggering,” Daley said. “While we in the medical community are guardedly hopeful and optimistic that the vaccines promise the end of the current pandemic, there is cause for concern that with the appearance of viral variants across the globe, we might be facing a decidedly novel stage of the contagion: COVID 2.0.” Various innovations, rise of women leaders, greater collaboration between scientists, clinicians, to name few Expert says falling COVID rates, rising vaccinations, timing may hamper spread Seeded amid the many surprises of COVID times, some unexpected positives Daley pointed out that while mutation is expected and most are harmless, the virus’ global spread gives it many more chances to hit on one that makes it more infectious or deadly. Jeremy Luban, a MassCPR member and professor at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, said that variants will continue to emerge and some, such as the P.1 version detected in Brazil, have caused alarm among scientists. In Manaus, Brazil, a large outbreak early in the pandemic caused scientists to conclude that nearly 70 percent of the population had been exposed and, after a lot of illness and death, the population had reached herd immunity. When the P.1 strain arrived in December, a second surge tore through the city, causing hospitalizations to rocket and raising concern the variant may be able to escape the immune response caused by prior infection.Other participants discussed the potential for variants to weaken not just the effectiveness of vaccines, but also that of treatments developed to help those already sick. Monoclonal antibodies, which mirror humans’ natural antibodies and also target the virus’ spike protein, are potentially at risk, according to Jonathan Abraham, assistant professor of microbiology. He said that antibodies that attack different parts of the spike can be developed and strategies to attack other proteins important to the virus can also be targeted. Remdesivir, for example, attacks enzymes that play key roles in viral replication. Enzymes are attractive targets, Abraham said, because they mutate less frequently than other proteins in the virus and so could potentially provide lasting protection against different variants.center_img Upgrade your mask as more-transmissible COVID strain surges In shift, experts now urge N95s or double-masking as variants set to dominate viral landscape So why did the state vaccine-reservation system crash? Related Looking at the particular challenges the government faces with digital projects last_img read more

Liverpool fear Real Madrid, PSG have unsettled Mane

first_imgLiverpool chiefs are fearful of a big-money raid from Real Madrid for Sadio Mane. Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeIncredible Discoveries That Puzzled The Whole WorldYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime8 Ways Drones Will Automate Our Future5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWhat Is A Black Hole And Is It Dangerous For Us All?6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True10 Amazing Characters We Wish Were Official Disney PrincessesWhat Is A Black Hole In Simple Terms?Which Country Is The Most Romantic In The World? The Sun says the Senegal international has yet to indicate that he will sign a whopping new deal offered to him nine months ago. And that has sparked fears among the Liverpool hierarchy that the 28-year-old will be tempted by a move to Madrid or Paris-Saint Germain.Advertisement Mane has been offered the same contract extension as center-half colossus Virgil van Dijk, which would make both players the highest-paid in Liverpool’s history. read also:Awoniyi not ready to copy Salah, Mane at Liverpool But while Van Dijk is expected to sign the five-year deal worth a massive £250,000-per week after Liverpool’s Premier League return against Everton on Sunday, Mane is still stalling on his offer. And now Real Madrid and PSG are targeting the £150million-rated forward. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… last_img read more

Syracuse still looking to find the right lineup

first_imgOne hour before doubles play begins, Syracuse players have no idea as to whom they are playing alongside, or in which position.Before every match, the team has a meal together, either breakfast or lunch depending on the time of day, junior Dina Hegab said. Then, head coach Younes Limam hosts a meeting with the players.“He tells us right before we come to the courts,” Hegab said.This season, the Orange has played different lineups in every match. All eight players have competed at least twice in singles, and Limam has sent out nine different doubles pairings through 14 doubles matches thus far this season. While Syracuse (4-1, 0-1 Atlantic Coast) has repeatedly changed the lineup due to both injury and rest, Syracuse boasts a 12-2 record in doubles.When everyone is healthy and available, Limam has his top two solidified in both singles and doubles. Gabriela Knutson is ranked No. 17 in the nation in singles, and the partnership of Knutson and sophomore Miranda Ramirez ranks No. 13 in the Intercollegiate Tennis Association doubles rankings. But Limam doesn’t always start his top-20 ranked players.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textOn opening day against Niagara, Ramirez was rested, leaving freshman Sofya Golubovskaya to make her debut at second singles. Golubovskaya cruised, 6-1, 6-1. Then, last Friday against Connecticut, Limam sat out Knutson, forcing the rest of the lineup to move up the ladder. Without Knutson, Syracuse rotated the doubles pairings by sending Anna Shkudun to first doubles alongside Golubovskaya, and shunting Ramirez down to second doubles with senior Nicole Mitchell. Golubovskaya and Shkudun lost 6-3, but Mitchell and Ramirez prevailed 6-2.When asked why Knutson didn’t play, Limam cited the length of the season.“We’re taking it one day at a time, it’s a long season,” Limam said. “(Knutson’s) good to go whenever we need her to be.”No one has been affected by the constant lineup changes more than Libi Mesh, who has partnered with four different doubles partners and played in two different singles positions. Despite the changes, Mesh is 3-1 in both doubles and singles.Lower on the ladder, Hegab is the only player to play every match this season in singles, as she holds an unbeaten 5-0 record. Whether it’s been at fourth, fifth or sixth singles, Hegab said she has used her improved service and fitness in singles to outgun her opponents. She’s had three different doubles partners and played in two different doubles positions, yet she still holds a 4-1 record in the doubles.“I’m glad everyone is ready and we’re all flexible to play with different partners,” Hegab said.Hegab and Masha Tritou have found the most success playing alongside one another, as Hegab’s power baseline play compliments the 6-foot Tritou’s size at the net to the tune of a 3-0 record as a duo. Despite the 3-0 record, Tritou sat out last Friday as Limam paired Mesh with Hegab. Playing together for the first time this year, the two jumped out to a 5-0 lead before collapsing, losing 7-6 in a match that decided the doubles point.Limam said there is no specific reason that he has played so many variations of doubles partners. He “doesn’t believe much,” in lineup positions, and he’s still looking to find what lineup will provide the most success as the Orange heads toward its conference matches.“We don’t know anything about the lineup decisions,” Hegab said. “I think we all play really good together.”Despite all of the tinkering with the lineups, Syracuse has started the season well. The Orange beat Columbia (5-2, 2-1 Ivy League) and nearly toppled Virginia (3-2, 1-0 ACC) in Charlottesville.The Orange plays Boston College and Yale this weekend. And while SU may know its opponents, its lineup remains a mystery. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on February 12, 2018 at 9:19 pm Contact Anthony: [email protected]last_img read more

KCCA 1 Sundowns 1: South Africans deny Ugandan champs

first_imgKCCA striker Sserunkuma scored their goal2017 Total CAF Champions LeagueKCCA FC 1 (2) Mamelodi Sundowns 1 (3)March 18th 2017: Platinum Stars 3 Vipers 1 (Platinum advance 3-2)Kampala Capital City Authority Football Club (KCCA FC) were held 1-1 by Mamelodi Sundowns and knocked out of the Total CAF Champions League 3-2 on aggregate.match at Phillip Omondi stadium, Kampala.Victory for the Uganda champions over the two legs would have made them the country’s first club to qualify for the lucrative Group Stages of the African Champions League. It would have guaranteed the club a minimum of $550,000. #KCCAvsSUN Tweets Share on: WhatsApplast_img

VIDEO: Doctors pull entire beach towel out of python’s mouth

first_img*WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT*Veterinarians in Australia pulled out an entire beach towel out of a snake!The owners of the 18-year-old jungle carpet python, Monty, say she ate the towel the night before.Vets were able to find the missing item in Monty’s stomach using an endoscope. Then, they used long forceps to grasp the towel and safely remove it.Monty was able to go back home with her owners, and is back to living her normal life.last_img

Letters To The Editor

first_imgIndependent Votes FioreTo The Editor:As a member of a third party, I have never affiliated myself with either the Republican or Democratic establishments. I have always been an advocate of voting for the best candidate on the ballot, regardless of their party affiliation. In Middletown Township, Republicans Tony Fiore and Stephanie Murray, two champions of fiscal responsibility, certainly fulfill that qualification.And yet, there are still those who blast the Republicans sitting on the Middletown Township Committee. Democrats in particular have begun making ludicrous accusations regarding Mayor Tony Fiore’s economic views. It is the same song and dance number performed every election cycle: whichever Middletown Republicans are seeking office are accused of raising taxes and reckless spending. These baseless claims directly contradict reality and the Committee’s stellar record of accomplishment.Take for example Democratic Committeewoman Marilyn Tuohy’s recent letter, which accused the incumbent mayor of raising taxes and “hiding the truth” about Middletown’s fiscal operations. The truth is that while careless spending may run rampant in other communities, the Middletown Township Committee has kept a firm hold on the monetary leash.The success of Mayor Fiore’s programs can be seen on a daily basis. After all, Middletown Township boasts the smallest per capita police force in Monmouth County, yet the lowest crime of any municipality. The town only employs three-hundred people, thus operating with a much smaller public sector than most similarly sized communities. Middletown, which also has a AA bond rating, has also been praised by Moody’s Investor Services for its fiscal integrity.If one actually studies the real truth regarding the state of operations within Middletown Township, it entirely eliminates any need to vote for the Democratic candidates. Mayor Fiore and his fellow Republicans have gone to great lengths to keep taxes low and morale high.-Dennis “Dj” MikolayMiddletownDerailed Fiscal PolicyTo the Editor:In a recent letter, “Real Solutions”, in the Oct. 28 edition of ***ITALSThe Two River Times**ENDTALS, Mayor Fiore admitted that Middletown government has real financial problems. I could not agree more.True to form, he falsely blames years of excessive spending; unnecessary bonding; escalating taxation and debt, all cradled in Republican mismanagement, on the Middletown Democrats who somehow magically made elected Republicans spend our tax dollars.This is just more empty rhetoric to go with decades of empty promises, failure to openly communicate and thwarted taxpayer dreams: no flood control along the Bay Shore; no turf fields; a lake yet to be dredged; a $400 thousand master recreation plan gathering dust; high density housing zoned in Lincroft and planned development of open space at Bamm Hollow.After Mr. Fiore strong-armed $500 thousand from library funds; took $350 thousand, for the second year in a row, from sewerage authority fees; used $1.3 million in public education funds; his so-called fiscal discipline required a 12 percent tax increase to cover $45million of a $62 million budget. This lack of incumbent Republican fiscal discipline has Middletown looking at a projected $2 million shortfall for the 2012 Middletown budget.Ask Mayor Fiore if he has a real solution. Past Republican practice points at raising taxes. During his term, he has contributed 22 percent to a 40 percent increase in taxes over the last five years. Past practice also points at adding to our $70 million in debt, which has increased 66 percent over the same five years.Finally, at least $2.4 million of $4 million in cuts claimed by Mayor Fiore was onetime nonrecurring expenses that were never part of the 2011 budget.In closing, Mr. Fiore notes that Middletown has been repeatedly named one of the Top 100 Places to Live by ***ITALSMoney**ENDTALS magazine; but Fiore fails to note that Middletown’s standing in the Magazine’s quality-of-life survey has eroded by 39 percent during the last four years.Put a stop to over 30 years of poor fiscal policy and borrowing; empty promises and unfulfilled expectations. Please help our community get back on track: Vote Grenafege and Fowler on November 8.James GrenafegeMiddletown Township CommitteeCandidateObamacrats?To The Editor:Looking at the local Democrat’s campaign propaganda spewed forth by their candidates, it became clearly apparent who the local Democrats really are-nothing more than the local branch of the Obama team.A look at their rhetoric makes this abundantly clear. Weep and wail about the plight of the taxpayer-but offer only vague, ambiguous platitudes-never statistics or specific ideas. Kowtow to wealthy, powerful special interests like affluent labor unions, developers and out of town contributors like large Hudson County book distributors while claming to be the voice of the little guy. Talk about two-faced!The very same Democrats who weep crocodile tears about the plight of the taxpayer, and, in the very same breath, decry Republicans for reducing budgets and meeting the State spending cap-those same Spend-o-Crats now call for more and more government spending! Absolutely no difference from the antics of the Obamacrats in Washington!But the real clincher is this-in a recent letter, one of the Democratic candidates really outs herself with the use of the word “change” and rhetoric that is taken directly from the Obama playbook.It’s clear who the Middletown Democratic candidates really are-nothing more than the local branch of the Obama Team!It’s bad enough in Washington and it’s the last thing we need in Middletown!Richard C. WintersMiddletownTaxes Sky High In MiddletownHave you heard that the Middletown’s mayor and his running mate want to hold the line on taxes? Hold it where, exactly? Somewhere in the stratosphere?I think the joke’s on us. Municipal taxes have gone up over 22% just during Mister Fiore’s 3-year term in office. Mr. Fiore voted for tax increases every year. Based on his record, I think we can expect more of the same.Republican candidates keep talking about making Middletown an affordable place to live, and then keep doing the opposite once they’re elected. You’d think they’d be too red in the face to keep talking about it.Mr. Fiore doesn’t seem to feel responsible for our high taxes since he is always talking about forces beyond his control. Well, that doesn’t inspire my confidence in his ability, and I won’t be voting for him.I think it’s time we had representatives who stopped making excuses and brought sound judgment to the job. Jim Grenafege has been a voice of reason for many years now. He is both informed and vocal about issues that are important to residents. Jim strongly supports televising town meetings so that we can all see what our local government is doing. He also feels the Township desperately needs the oversight of a Finance Committee, which almost every other town has. After seeing taxes double in such a short time, I have to agree with him.Please join me in supporting Jim Grenafege for Middletown Township Committee this Election Day.William G. ButlerHEAD: Honoring VeteransTo The Editor:,The New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial Foundation invites you to attend our Veterans Day Ceremony Friday, November 11th, beginning at 11 a.m. The ceremony is free and open to the public.Major General Clark W. Martin (U.S. Air Force Ret.) is this year’s keynote speaker. Martin is the former assistant adjutant general and commander of the New Jersey Air National Guard. He is a Vietnam veteran, having flown 153 combat missions and currently serves as chairman of the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial Foundation.As part of the annual ceremony, the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial will induct four veterans into the “In Memory” program, which honors those who served in Vietnam and later passed away as a result of their tour, but whose names are not on the Memorial. The four inductees are Manning J. Jones, U.S. Army, West Milford, NJ, who died on Dec. 22, 1996; Roman P. Niedzwiedz, U.S. Army, Evesham Township, NJ, who died on March 6, 2010; Robert M. O’Connell, U.S. Army, Mahwah, NJ, who died on Aug. 18, 2004; and Albert T. Schillaci, U.S. Army, Rutherford, NJ, who died on Aug. 17, 2009.Family members will say a few words about their loved one and light a candle in their memory.Additional participants include Lisa Coppola, a well-known singer-songwriter; Joseph Formola, Chaplain, NJ State Council, Vietnam Veterans of America; Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 200 Color Guard, with General Anthony C. McAuliffe NY/NJ Chapter, 101st Airborne Division Association; and Plainfield High School USAF JROTC.If you would like more information about the Veterans Day Ceremony or the “In Memory Program” , please go to our website www.njvvmf.org, or Call Lynn Duane at (732) 355- 0033 ext. 100The Vietnam Veterans Memorial FoundationHolmdelResidents Deserve BetterTo The Editor:I am running as an Independent Candidate for Monmouth County Freeholder for the upcoming November 8th election. My main reason for running for Freeholder, is to push for more fiscal discipline at the county level.Monmouth County government spends over $500 million a year. Over $300 million comes from property taxes. Is that money being spent in your community? The Freeholders almost raised your county property taxes in 2011, but decided at the last minute to use over $40 million in surplus funds to balance the budget. That was fiscally irresponsible and leaves taxpayers vulnerable in 2012.They are spending more than they take in and the future looks worse.The mismanagement at Brookdale College under the Freeholders and Board of Trustees watch, was a fiasco of the largest order. When the administration was spending taxpayer money on alcohol, country club dues, and other frivolous expenses, they attempted to raise tuition by 8 percent. Is Brookdale just the tip of the iceberg on how your money is being spent. I believe it is.The county has golf courses, nursing homes, marinas and still has a problem plowing county roads. How is your money being spent? Do you think there is waste at the county level? Is Monmouth County government helping your town provide services and save money? The answer is sadly….no.We cannot continue to allow the Freeholders to be unfocussed, ambivalent and “ethically challenged”. Monmouth County residents deserve better.I am committed to making Monmouth County government more relevant and more efficient. If we are going to spend a half a billion dollars, we need to do it better and do it more fairly. I ask for your support on Nov 8th, to bring an independent voice to the Monmouth Freeholders. Politics as usual and party bickering are counter productive and you deserve better. Monmouth County government must be more relevant and better managed.Tom MarkowskiIndependent Candidate for Monmouth County Freeholderlast_img read more

Rumson Girl Swims To First In Freestyle At Junior Olympics

first_imgBy Mary RyanCaroline Gmelich, 12, of Rumson, just finished competing this past weekend at Rutgers University in the New Jersey Junior Olympics for swimming. The Junior Olympics represent the highest level of swimming competition in the state, and swimmers can only compete if they achieve difficult time cuts per event. Caroline, who swims year round for the Central Jersey Aquatic Club (“CJAC”), qualified for nine events in the 11-12 Girls Age Group (the maximum a swimmer can do at a meet) and two relays. Between 50 and 60 swimmers qualified in each event.Caroline finished first in the 200 Yard Freestyle and the 200 Yard Backstroke; second in the 50 Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard Freestyle, and the 200 Yard Individual Medley; third in the 50 Yard Freestyle and the 100 Yard Backstroke; fourth in the 100 Yard Individual Medley; and seventh in the 100 Yard Butterfly. These results made Caroline the “Top Point Earner” for the Junior Olympics. The results also qualified Caroline to compete in eight events in the East Coast Zones meet in Webster, NY in two weeks. The Zones meet is comprised of 12 separate regions on the East Coast including New Jersey, New England, Maryland, Connecticut and Virginia. Only the fastest swimmers in those regions are invited to compete at Zones.Caroline is currently a seventh grade student at Rumson Country Day School.last_img read more

Lucky Saints supporters get shot at $5000 during Saturday’s Fan Appreciation Night

first_imgIt’s $5000 and its up for grabs to three lucky Saints supporters during Saturday’s Fan Appreciation Night as Selkirk College wraps up an amazing B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League season at 7:30 p.m. in the Castlegar Recreation Complex.The shot a $5000 is just one of many contests and prize giveaways during the festive evening. The highlight of the evening will come during the second intermission, when three lucky fans will have the chance to Shoot to Win $5000! “All of our players and staff have been thrilled with the great fan support we’ve received this year, and we’re looking forward to capping off the regular season with a great performance and hopefully send a fan home with a big $5000 prize,” said Saints head coach Jeff Dubois. The game will also feature a number of prize giveaways from team sponsors like Boston Pizza, Ric’s Grill, and Panago Pizza and the always-popular Big Mac Minute, presented by the Castlegar McDonald’s. Providing the opposition on Saturday is an Eastern Washington squad that enters weekend play tied for the fourth and final playoff position in the B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League standings.The teams also meet on Friday night in Cheney, WA. In addition to the $5000 Shoot to Win contest and prize giveaways, fans who attend Saturday’s game will have the opportunity to recognize Selkirk’s graduating players and see the team’s 2012/13 season awards distributed in a pre-game ceremony. Tickets for Saturday’s game will be available at the door for $8 (Adults) and $5 (Selkirk students & staff, seniors, children 6 & older). Face-off is set for 7:30 PM.last_img read more

Nelson Selects claim most of hardware at Terry Walgren Tournament

first_imgTeams from throughout the Kootenays challenges Nelson Youth Soccer squads for bragging rights at the annual Terry Walgren Tournament this past weekend at the Lakeside Fields.And the host club did not disappoint the home crowds as Nelson teams captured no less than five titles during the three-day tourney.In the U14 Girls Division, Nelson Selects ran the table en route to capturing the Gold Medal. Nelson, after topping Pool A, bounced Kootenay South to win the top prize.The Selects defeated Nelson U13s in the semi final.In the U16 Girls division, Nelson also got past Kootenay South to take home the Gold Medal.The Selects finished second to Kootenay South in round robin play before knocking off the West Kootenay rivals in the Championship.In the U18 Girls Division, the U16 Selects pushed the U18 squad from Nelson to the limit but was unable to knock off the NYS cousins as the older squad took home the Gold Medal. The U18 Selects defeated the U16 squad 4-1 in round robin action.Both Nelson teams had easy times knocking off Kootenay South and Columbia Valley to reach the final.In Boys action, the Kootenay South edged a Nelson split squad for the Gold Medal in the U13 Boy’s Division.Nelson U13 boys split their team to play in both the U13 and U14 Divisions.In the U14 Division, Nelson U14s won the gold medal getting past Nelson U13s in the final.In the U15 Division, Kootenay South edged Fernie for the title.In the U16 Boys, Nelson outlasted Kootenay South for the title while Kootenay South edged Nelson U18s for the top prize in the U18 Boys Division.Both Nelson and Kootenay South finished in a tie with 23 points following round robin action in the U16 Boy’s Division.The Nelson tournament is named after Terry Walgren, a long time Nelson Youth Soccer Rep coach and Men’s Soccer player who lost a battle against cancer.Some Rep teams are now off to Kamloops to participate in the May Longweekend tourney in Spoolmak Country.last_img read more